Workshop Materials

It’s On Us is committed to providing high-quality, free-to-use sexual violence awareness and prevention education trainings and supportive materials to our network of campus chapters. Our six core awareness and prevention programs address the needs of modern campus communities today. We strongly encourage It’s On Us Chapters and Student Organizers implementing these programs to check out our Workshop Facilitators Guide before hosting any of the following trainings.

Our Core Trainings

Sexual Assault Awareness & Consent Education

Christina — I Owe You Consent

Overview

I Owe You Consent is Christina’s survivor story. She is a former student and current survivor activist. She share the story of a night when she did not consent to any sexual activity and the effects that night has had on the rest of her life.

Play Christina’s video at the training, a sporting event, and any place where you have an audience. If you are in a smaller group setting, use the following questions to discuss the video.

Questions

  1. What was the video about? Is there a call to action?
  2. Why is it significant that a real student was telling a real story?
  3. What are some way Christina describes her trauma being manifested?
  4. Christina talks about who she would look over her shoulder at every turn in her college town for the two years following her assault. Why did she do this so often and for so long?
  5. What are some of the things that Christina did after her assault as part of her own personal healing process?
  6. What are some examples of ways we can identify if consent was given?

Bystander Education

Vlad — I Owe You Action

Overview

I Owe You Action is a bystander intervention story told by Vlad, a former student. He tells a story of a night when he saw something risky happening and he decided to take action and intervene. Being an active bystander is something anyone can do – there are many ways to take action to prevent a potential sexual assault.

Play Vlad’s video at a workshop/training, a sporting event, and any place where you have an audience. If you are in a smaller group setting, use the following questions to discuss the video.

Questions

  1. What was this video about? What did the story mean to you?
  2. Why is it significant that a real student was telling a real story?
  3. Are the feelings Vlad describes at the party something that you have related to before?
  4. Why was it important for Vlad to go back to have a conversation with the person exhibiting risky behavior about the incidents even after removing him from the party?
  5. What are some reasons Vlad recognized this situation to be risky?
  6. What are some other ways Vlad could have responded to this risky behavior if he was not comfortable going up to this person directly?

Survivor Support

Carly — I Owe You Support

Overview

I Owe You Support is a survivor support story told by Carly, a former student. She tells a story of a friend who was sexually assaulted and needed her support. Carly tells her what she wished someone had told her.

Play Carly’s video at a workshop/training, a sporting event, and any place where you have an audience. If you are in a smaller group setting, use the following questions to discuss the video.

Questions

  1. What was this video about? What did this story mean to you?
  2. Why is it significant that a real student was telling a real story?
  3. Why was it important for Carly to offer her support?
  4. If Carly did not feel like she was able or had the capacity to support this friend, what are some of the things she could have done to ensure she received support?
  5. Carly offered a listening ear, reminders of her sister’s strength and reassurance that she will get through this. What are other examples of what one could say to a friend who discloses an assault?
  6. It can be difficult to support a friend who has experienced trauma. What are some ways to ensure you are taking care of yourself after providing support?

Intimate Partner Violence Awareness

With the generous support of YSL Beaute, It’s On Us is able to provide two new trainings on intimate partner violence/dating violence. 

In this training, students will learn about the prevalence of intimate partner violence, the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the rates of this violence, and how to identify and then support a friend or peer that is experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). 

IPV is one of the most common forms of violence against women and includes physical, sexual, financial, and emotional abuse, as well as controlling behaviours by an intimate partner. In the United States young people are disproportionately affected by IPV.

Play the following video while hosting an Intimate Partner Violence Awareness training, to spread awareness on social media, or to help a friend identify the possible signs of violence.

Use the following questions to guide the conversation:

  1. What are some characteristics of a healthy relationship?
  2. What are some characteristics of an unhealthy relationship? 
  3. Virtual abuse is also abuse. Can you give an example of virtual intimate partner violence?
  4. Are there any examples in pop culture where you have seen intimate partner violence portrayed?

Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

With the generous support of YSL Beaute, It’s On Us is able to provide two new trainings on intimate partner violence/dating violence (IPV). 

In this training, students will learn about ways to intervene when a friend or peer may be experiencing intimate partner violence. This training will discuss the role of power and control in relationships as well as each of our roles in building a more trusting culture in our campus communities.

Play the following video while hosting an Intimate Partner Violence Prevention training or in any group setting to start a conversation about how to intervene in intimate partner violence.

Use the following questions to guide the conversation:

  1. What are some ways to intervene if you see characteristics of an unhealthy relationship? 
    • Call out toxic behavior! 
    • Check in with your friends to make sure they feel safe. 
    • Call someone for backup.
    • If your friend does not want to talk to you about it, provide them with resources on or around campus for support. 

We can not always predict how a friend will respond or react to our methods of intervention. Do not be pushy if they are in denial, remind them you are there for support if they need anything.

Online Dating Safety

With the generous support of Tinder, It’s On Us is able to provide a new training on online dating safety.

In this training, students will learn about the intersection of online dating and dating violence, as well as ways to stay safe while online dating. 

Over the past several years, online dating has transformed the way we meet and develop relationships. Some studies also show that dating apps and websites have become the most popular way for couples to meet in the United States. 

Whether you have time for the whole training or now, gather a group of students and discuss the following questions to start a conversation on online dating safety. 

  1. What are some warning signs that an online dating relationship may be unhealthy? 
  2. What are some examples of ways that social media can be used in online dating violence? 
  3. What can you do if you believe a friend or peer may be experiencing online dating violence?  
  4. What are your legal rights against this type of violence? 

*We want you to do everything you can to stay safe when online dating, but it is EXTREMELY important to acknowledge that it shouldn’t have to be that way. You should not have to go out of your way to be safe and it is completely unfair that some people have to take more precautions than others based on their biological sex, gender identity, race, and/or sexuality.